Commit a2490fe0 authored by Timo Koch's avatar Timo Koch
Browse files

[examples][freeflowchannel] Toggle less in main file

parent 82d86e26
......@@ -291,10 +291,8 @@ The following class contains functionality for additional flux output to the con
#include "problem.hh"
```
</details>
</details>
```cpp
```
### Setup basic properties for our simulation
We setup the DuMux properties for our simulation (click [here](https://git.iws.uni-stuttgart.de/dumux-repositories/dumux-course/blob/master/slides/dumux-course-properties.pdf) for DuMux course slides on the property system) within the namespace Properties, which is a sub-namespace of Dumux.
......@@ -340,8 +338,6 @@ struct EnableGridGeometryCache<TypeTag, TTag::ChannelExample> { static constexpr
We begin the main function by making the type tag `ChannelExample`, that we defined in `problem.hh` for this test problem available here.
Then we initializing the message passing interface (MPI), even if we do not plan to run the application in parallel. Finalizing of the MPI is done automatically on exit.
We continue by printing the dumux start message and parsing the command line arguments and runtimeparameters from the input file in the init function.
<details>
<summary>Toggle to expand code (beginning of main)</summary>
```cpp
int main(int argc, char** argv) try
......@@ -357,7 +353,6 @@ int main(int argc, char** argv) try
Parameters::init(argc, argv);
```
</details>
### Set-up and solving of the problem
......@@ -374,8 +369,6 @@ and then use the solution vector to intialize the `gridVariables`. Grid variable
primary variables (velocities, pressures) as well as secondary variables (density, viscosity, ...).
We then initialize the vtkoutput. Each model has a predefined model-specific output with relevant parameters
for that model. Here, it is pressure, velocity, density and process rank (relevant in the case of parallelisation).
<details>
<summary>Toggle to expand code</summary>
```cpp
GridManager<GetPropType<TypeTag, Properties::Grid>> gridManager;
......@@ -405,7 +398,6 @@ for that model. Here, it is pressure, velocity, density and process rank (releva
IOFields::initOutputModule(vtkWriter); // Add model specific output fields
vtkWriter.write(0.0);
```
</details>
We set up two surfaces over which fluxes are calculated.
We determine the extensions [xMin,xMax]x[yMin,yMax] of the physical domain.
......@@ -415,8 +407,6 @@ at the position of the surface (which is required for the flux calculation).
In this case, we add half a cell-width to the x-position in order to make sure that
the cell faces lie on the surface. This assumes a regular cartesian grid.
The second surface (second call of addSurface) is placed at the outlet of the channel.
<details>
<summary>Toggle to expand code (addition of surfaces)</summary>
```cpp
FluxOverSurface<GridVariables,
......@@ -451,7 +441,6 @@ The second surface (second call of addSurface) is placed at the outlet of the ch
const auto p1outlet = GlobalPosition{xMax, yMax};
flux.addSurface("outlet", p0outlet, p1outlet);
```
</details>
The incompressible Stokes equation depends only linearly on the velocity, so we could use a linear solver to solve the problem.
Here, we use the show the more general case which would also work for incompressible fluids or the
......
......@@ -88,9 +88,8 @@
#include "problem.hh"
// </details>
//
// </details>
//
//
// ### Setup basic properties for our simulation
// We setup the DuMux properties for our simulation (click [here](https://git.iws.uni-stuttgart.de/dumux-repositories/dumux-course/blob/master/slides/dumux-course-properties.pdf) for DuMux course slides on the property system) within the namespace Properties, which is a sub-namespace of Dumux.
......@@ -134,8 +133,6 @@ struct EnableGridGeometryCache<TypeTag, TTag::ChannelExample> { static constexpr
// We begin the main function by making the type tag `ChannelExample`, that we defined in `problem.hh` for this test problem available here.
// Then we initializing the message passing interface (MPI), even if we do not plan to run the application in parallel. Finalizing of the MPI is done automatically on exit.
// We continue by printing the dumux start message and parsing the command line arguments and runtimeparameters from the input file in the init function.
//<details>
// <summary>Toggle to expand code (beginning of main)</summary>
//
int main(int argc, char** argv) try
{
......@@ -149,7 +146,6 @@ int main(int argc, char** argv) try
DumuxMessage::print(/*firstCall=*/true);
Parameters::init(argc, argv);
// </details>
//
// ### Set-up and solving of the problem
//
......@@ -166,8 +162,6 @@ int main(int argc, char** argv) try
// primary variables (velocities, pressures) as well as secondary variables (density, viscosity, ...).
// We then initialize the vtkoutput. Each model has a predefined model-specific output with relevant parameters
// for that model. Here, it is pressure, velocity, density and process rank (relevant in the case of parallelisation).
//<details>
// <summary>Toggle to expand code</summary>
//
GridManager<GetPropType<TypeTag, Properties::Grid>> gridManager;
gridManager.init();
......@@ -195,7 +189,6 @@ int main(int argc, char** argv) try
StaggeredVtkOutputModule<GridVariables, SolutionVector> vtkWriter(*gridVariables, x, problem->name());
IOFields::initOutputModule(vtkWriter); // Add model specific output fields
vtkWriter.write(0.0);
// </details>
//
// We set up two surfaces over which fluxes are calculated.
// We determine the extensions [xMin,xMax]x[yMin,yMax] of the physical domain.
......@@ -205,8 +198,6 @@ int main(int argc, char** argv) try
// In this case, we add half a cell-width to the x-position in order to make sure that
// the cell faces lie on the surface. This assumes a regular cartesian grid.
// The second surface (second call of addSurface) is placed at the outlet of the channel.
//<details>
// <summary>Toggle to expand code (addition of surfaces)</summary>
//
FluxOverSurface<GridVariables,
SolutionVector,
......@@ -239,7 +230,6 @@ int main(int argc, char** argv) try
const auto p0outlet = GlobalPosition{xMax, yMin};
const auto p1outlet = GlobalPosition{xMax, yMax};
flux.addSurface("outlet", p0outlet, p1outlet);
// </details>
//
// The incompressible Stokes equation depends only linearly on the velocity, so we could use a linear solver to solve the problem.
// Here, we use the show the more general case which would also work for incompressible fluids or the
......
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